Kwasi Yeboah

Trainee Solicitor
London
Corporate General

Kwasi Yeboah

Trainee Solicitor
London
Corporate General
Lisa Goodman

Kwasi Yeboah

Why did you choose Ropes & Gray to start your legal career?

I decided to train at Ropes & Gray because of the entrepreneurial nature of the firm. I have been given the opportunity to work with and learn from leading lawyers in specialist fields, whilst taking on responsibility at an early stage in my career. 

How did you find the recruitment and selection process?

The recruitment and selection process were challenging. Everyone at the assessment center was encouraging, welcoming and willing to answer our questions, which also made the experience enjoyable. 

How would you describe the firm’s culture?

Everyone across the firm is given the opportunity to excel, whether that is in terms of opportunities to work on leading cases and transactions, or opportunities outside of work, such as pro bono
The firm is also fun and welcoming. While working remotely, we were always encouraged to pick up the phone to connect with our colleagues and were invited to a wide range of virtual events, including cocktail-making classes and virtual escape rooms. It has been exciting to be back in the office and there continues to be a number of social events to connect with colleagues.

Tell us about a memorable matter you’ve worked on.

I was part of a team that advised Partners Group, a global private equity firm, on the acquisition of a majority stake in Rovensa, a Portugal-based provider of specialty crop nutrition products. This deal was notable for its size-- Rovensa was valued at an enterprise value of around EUR1 billion. It also stood out to me because of its ESG implications. Rovensa is committed to producing sustainable products which reduce the environmental impact of agriculture, combat its contribution to climate change and support the cultivation of healthy food.

Tell us about a pro bono matter you’ve worked on.

I assisted with the drafting of sections of the Exporting Corruption report, published by Transparency International, an organization which aims to stop corruption and promote transparency, accountability and integrity at all levels and across all sectors of society. The report rates the performance of global exporters, including 43 countries which are signatories of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Anti-Bribery Convention. It shows how well these countries and organisations are enforcing anti-bribery and corruption rules.

What tips would you give a potential applicant?

Familiarise yourself with corporate lawyers’ work at a high level (i.e. try and understand the distinction between contentious and non-contentious work) and how this differs depending on the different types of law firms there are in the market. You should then reflect on your educational, legal and non-legal experiences to try and determine the kind of firm and work you would be suited to.